Feed aggregator

Get the giggles often? It may be in your DNA

UC Berkeley Science News - Wed, 06/03/2015 - 08:00
Researchers have found that a gene involved in the regulation of serotonin makes some of us more prone to spontaneous smiles and bursts of laughter. People with the short version of the gene were more likely to smile and laugh while looking at Far Side and New Yorker cartoons and humorous clips from the movie Strangers in Paradise.

Get the giggles often? It may be in your DNA

UC Berkeley Science News - Wed, 06/03/2015 - 08:00
Researchers have found that a gene involved in the regulation of serotonin makes some of us more prone to spontaneous smiles and bursts of laughter. People with the short version of the gene were more likely to smile and laugh while looking at Far Side and New Yorker cartoons and humorous clips from the movie Strangers in Paradise.

High hopes as Large Hadron Collider pumps protons to ever higher energy

UC Berkeley Science News - Wed, 06/03/2015 - 06:50
Physicists from UC Berkeley and around the world harbor great expectations as the world’s most powerful particle accelerator, the Large Hadron Collider in Geneva, Switzerland, officially restarts operations today at a much greater energy than ever before.

High hopes as Large Hadron Collider pumps protons to ever higher energy

UC Berkeley Science News - Wed, 06/03/2015 - 06:50
Physicists from UC Berkeley and around the world harbor great expectations as the world’s most powerful particle accelerator, the Large Hadron Collider in Geneva, Switzerland, officially restarts operations today at a much greater energy than ever before.

U.S. bringing up the middle on gender-science stereotyping

UC Berkeley Science News - Tue, 06/02/2015 - 10:14
UC Berkeley professor Marcia Linn co-authored a study of more than 350,000 people in 66 countries showing that gender stereotyping in which men are more strongly associated with science than women is found in some unlikely countries, with the Netherlands leading the list.

U.S. bringing up the middle on gender-science stereotyping

UC Berkeley Science News - Mon, 06/01/2015 - 17:00
UC Berkeley professor Marcia Linn co-authored a study of more than 350,000 people in 66 countries showing that gender stereotyping in which men are more strongly associated with science than women is found in some unlikely countries, with the Netherlands leading the list.

Poor sleep linked to toxic buildup of Alzheimer’s protein, memory loss

UC Berkeley Science News - Mon, 06/01/2015 - 08:00
Sleep may be a missing piece of the Alzheimer's puzzle. The toxic protein that is the hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease blocks the deepest stages of sleep, resulting in memory decline, according to new research.

Poor sleep linked to toxic buildup of Alzheimer’s protein, memory loss

UC Berkeley Science News - Mon, 06/01/2015 - 08:00
Sleep may be a missing piece of the Alzheimer's puzzle. The toxic protein that is the hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease blocks the deepest stages of sleep, resulting in memory decline, according to new research.

Q&A with Pat Crawford: How research changes food policy, politics

UC Berkeley Science News - Thu, 05/28/2015 - 09:48
Research is the most powerful way to influence national food policy and politics, says Pat Crawford, who should know. Her research — as co-founder of the Center for Weight and Health at Berkeley, an adjunct professor of nutrition and now research director at UC’s Nutrition Policy Institute — has had a mighty influence on what we eat.

Q&A with Pat Crawford: How research changes food policy, politics

UC Berkeley Science News - Thu, 05/28/2015 - 09:48
Research is the most powerful way to influence national food policy and politics, says Pat Crawford, who should know. Her research — as co-founder of the Center for Weight and Health at Berkeley, an adjunct professor of nutrition and now research director at UC’s Nutrition Policy Institute — has had a mighty influence on what we eat.

New technique allows study of clouds in 3-D

UC Berkeley Science News - Wed, 05/27/2015 - 10:06
With two off-the-shelf digital cameras situated about 1 kilometer apart, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory scientists David Romps and Rusen Oktem are collecting three-dimensional data on cloud behavior that have never been possible to collect before. Romps is also an assistant professor of earth and planetary science at Berkeley.

Watch the Greener Solutions Video!

News from the GreenChemBlog - Tue, 05/26/2015 - 20:40
Curious about what goes on in the Greener Solutions course at the Berkeley Center for Green Chemistry? Learn more about it by watching this short video!Filed under: Environmental Chemistry

Five innovative faculty named Bakar Fellows

UC Berkeley Science News - Tue, 05/26/2015 - 16:37
Five new faculty innovators have joined the ranks of the Bakar Fellows Program, which supports Berkeley faculty working to apply scientific discoveries to real-world issues in the fields of engineering, computer science, chemistry and biological and physical sciences. The 2015-16 fellows are computer scientists Pieter Abbeel and Michael Lustig, physicist Holger Müller, architect Ronald Rael and chemist Ke Xu.

Five innovative faculty named Bakar Fellows

UC Berkeley Science News - Tue, 05/26/2015 - 16:37
Five new faculty innovators have joined the ranks of the Bakar Fellows Program, which supports Berkeley faculty working to apply scientific discoveries to real-world issues in the fields of engineering, computer science, chemistry and biological and physical sciences. The 2015-16 fellows are computer scientists Pieter Abbeel and Michael Lustig, physicist Holger Müller, architect Ronald Rael and chemist Ke Xu.

Hunting supernovas with supercomputers

UC Berkeley Science News - Thu, 05/21/2015 - 09:20
Thanks to supercomputer models produced by Berkeley physicist Dan Kasen, astronomers were able to quickly find and study a distant Type Ia supernova, the kind used for calibrating the cosmos. These rare early measurements confirmed a theory that at least some Type Ia supernovae are produced when a white dwarf pulls mass from a binary companion until it explodes.

Hunting supernovas with supercomputers

UC Berkeley Science News - Thu, 05/21/2015 - 09:20
Thanks to supercomputer models produced by Berkeley physicist Dan Kasen, astronomers were able to quickly find and study a distant Type Ia supernova, the kind used for calibrating the cosmos. These rare early measurements confirmed a theory that at least some Type Ia supernovae are produced when a white dwarf pulls mass from a binary companion until it explodes.

In post-Soviet Russia, Lenin’s body still a powerful symbol

UC Berkeley Science News - Wed, 05/20/2015 - 05:00
For 90 years, the embalmed corpse of Russian revolutionary Vladimir Lenin has been on public display in Moscow’s Red Square. But ever since the Soviet Union collapsed, a debate has raged over whether to move it - or bury him once and for all. UC Berkeley social anthropologist Alexei Yurchak, an expert on the science and politics surrounding the corpse, believes the body won't be moved anytime soon.

In post-Soviet Russia, Lenin’s body still a powerful symbol

UC Berkeley Science News - Wed, 05/20/2015 - 05:00
For 90 years, the embalmed corpse of Russian revolutionary Vladimir Lenin has been on public display in Moscow’s Red Square. But ever since the Soviet Union collapsed, a debate has raged over whether to move it - or bury him once and for all. UC Berkeley social anthropologist Alexei Yurchak, an expert on the science and politics surrounding the corpse, believes the body won't be moved anytime soon.

Cold-blooded animals find it hard to adjust to global warming

UC Berkeley Science News - Tue, 05/19/2015 - 15:59
Cold-blooded and other animals that are unable to regulate their internal temperature may have a hard time tolerating global warming, according to an analysis by biologists Alex Gunderson and Jonathon Stillman from UC Berkeley and San Francisco State University.

Discovery paves way for homebrewed drugs, prompts call for regulation

UC Berkeley Science News - Mon, 05/18/2015 - 13:00
A research team led by UC Berkeley bioengineers has completed key steps needed to turn sugar-fed yeast into a microbial factory for producing morphine and potentially other drugs, including antibiotics and anticancer agents. The process could soon become as straightforward as making homebrewed beer, prompting calls for urgent regulation.