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Raging Hormones – Gram-Scale Synthesis of Prostaglandin PGF2α

“Stereocontrolled organocatalytic synthesis of prostaglandin PGF in seven steps” Coulthard, G.; Erb, W.; Aggarwal, V. K. Nature 2012, online view. DOI: 10.1038/nature11411

In my very un-scientific survey of the green chemistry-branded journals, I see way more new methodologies than I see total syntheses. I hope to single-handedly change this, and show how green a total synthesis can be by writing about the awesome recent synthesis of prostaglandin PGF by Aggarwal and coworkers. First, a few words on the target molecule. Being hormones, prostaglandins such as PGF are involved in tons of biological processes. Interestingly, instead of being synthesized by some important gland and acting in far-off regions of the body as are endocrine hormones, they are autocrine or paracrine hormones and are synthesized “on-site.” The first structural characterizations of prostaglandins came in the 1960s, some 30 years after their initial discovery. Soon after, they became the subject of numerous syntheses, the first of which was achieved by E. J. Corey in 1969. A series of syntheses followed, but even 40 years later, the structurally-related glaucoma drug latanoprost is synthesized in 20 steps using Corey’s 1969 prostaglandin strategy.

That’s right, the prostglandin structural motif is medicinally relevant. So, not only would an improved synthesis be cool from a fundamental science perspective, it might actually be moved into industrial production and have an immediate impact! (more…)